WSP [Bekijk forum]  >> WSP Forum [Bekijk forum]  >> Politiek & Maatschappij [Bekijk forum]
 [1]   [2]   [3] 

Ga naar: "De VN aan zet....."

Yutte Brøtbørda: De VN aan zet..... (ma sep 16, 2013 2:06 pm)

Vandaag is de dag dat de VN Veiligheidsraad te horen krijgt dat er op 21 augustus inderdaad een gifgasaanval heeft plaatsgevonden op de burgerbevolking van bepaalde wijken in Damascus, en dat alle bewijs over de schuldvraag in de richting van het Assad regime en regeringsgetrouwe troepen wijst.
Vandaag is ook een week nadat Human Rights Watch op basis van haar eigen onafhankelijke onderzoek precies dezelfde conclusies trok.

Vandaag plaats ik een aangrijpend stuk dat ik van 't weekend tegenkwam in de Washington Post, geschreven door de (Alevitische!) Syrische schrijfster Samar Yazbek; Een stuk dat durft te benoemen in welk een tweeslachtigheid mensen terecht kunnen komen als ze eerlijk over dit soort zaken nadenken, vanuit het besef dat in de oorlog waarin men terecht is gekomen " goed " en " kwaad " niet meer als dusdanig te onderscheiden zijn, maar dwars door elkaar heenlopen.

The novelist vs. the revolutionary: My own Syrian debate
Samar Yazbek

I am two women. They stand head to head, at loggerheads.

The revolutionary in me joined what started as peaceful demonstrations against the Syrian government in March 2011. The novelist in me fled to France that July.



The revolutionary, who has several times since then furtively crossed the border back into her country, is steeped in the smell of blood. She wipes the dust off the corpses of children disfigured by violence, stops to wring out her heart, then carries on.

The novelist struggles to close her eyes to the atrocities: She can’t take any more. She begs the revolutionary to stop walking through Syria’s circles of hell.

But the other voice rebukes her: “It is up to you to step into this hell, to bear witness to it, darling novelist. It is up to you to work against all that is dark and violent, everything that is leading your country to ruin.”

The novelist, living in exile, in the world of politicians and diplomats, far removed from falling shells and sudden death, wonders whether Syria should be hesitant about welcoming military strikes from the West. She argues that no country has the right to interfere in the affairs of another, that independence and national sovereignty are sacred. And she questions whether hitting military targets without taking down President Bashar al-Assad, especially while Russia and Iran continue to support him, will bring a shift from the inhumanity that the regime has imposed.

The revolutionary, moving among guerilla fighters and civilian activists, stands by those who are living under the regime’s bombardment and dying at the hands of its military machine. She argues that sovereignty shouldn’t mean the freedom to kill one’s own people, to displace them or to force a sectarian wedge between them. She notes that the soldiers she overheard speaking Farsi when the rural town of Haish was annihilated are evidence that international intervention happened long ago. She adds that Syria is not the Assad regime. Syria is the Syrian people.

The novelist looks on with bewilderment at the religious extremism of groups supposedly representing the opposition: preventing women from going out in public, carrying out arrests, threats and killings, all in the name of Islam.

The revolutionary, who has met with leaders of Jabhat al-Nusra, Ahrar al-Sham and other influential jihadist battalions, is gripped by fear at what they represent. But she believes that Assad has encouraged them, knowing that an unsavory alternative to his regime makes the international community hesitant to intervene. She has interviewed dozens of jihadists who told her they had been in Assad’s prisons until they were suddenly released at the beginning of the revolution. She believes that Assad’s violence gives them legitimacy and that only the elimination of the regime can rescue Syrians from the increasing threat of extremism.

This same woman has witnessed the presence of moderate fighters and heroic civilian activists who have not received the support they need. And she recalls long talks with Syrian families who reject the exclusion of women and with the mothers who keep walking their children to school, despite the continual shelling by Assad’s warplanes.

The novelist regrets that the opposition movement has evolved from its peaceful origin. She refuses to condone, let alone applaud, armed uprisings. “Isn’t political opposition the better alternative?” she meekly suggests.

The other woman laughs in her face and rejects her logic. “What are you waiting for, you futile scribbler, when more than 100,000 people lie dead and thousands are imprisoned or missing? When hospitals are being shelled and doctors targeted, when there are massacres in bakeries and people are deprived of water and electricity? What more do you ask of your people? What kind of justice is it that you’re after?”

These two women crash about beneath my skin, colliding at every twist and turn of this unfinished narrative. But there’s one thing they agree on: Anything that might bring a definitive end to the murderous Assad and his regime is a force for good. The question is: Does the world really want to stop these atrocities, or is it happy to stand by and watch?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-novelist-vs-the-revolutionary-my-own-syrian-debate/2013/09/13/188fad04-1b51-11e3-a628-7e6dde8f889d_story.html?hpid=z3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samar_Yazbek


Mijn stelling is meer een vraag: Hoe ver moet deze waanzin nog doorgaan, hoeveel kinderen moeten nog verminkt of vermoord worden, voordat een vredesproces een kans zal krijgen?

De VN is nu aan zet.
Het is de hoogste tijd dat de VN geloofwaardige stappen zet, stappen die een einde aan het bloedvergieten daadwerkelijk dichterbij brengt.

osker: Re: De VN aan zet..... (ma sep 16, 2013 2:37 pm)

De VN is langzaam, machteloos en weinig slagvaardig.
Het wachten is op een krachtige stellingname, met deadlines en ultimatums. Duidelijkheid, zoals Moon vorige week deed toen hij dacht dat de camera's uitstonden.

da Vinci: Re: De VN aan zet..... (ma sep 16, 2013 3:58 pm)


Vandaag is de dag dat de VN Veiligheidsraad te horen krijgt dat er op 21 augustus inderdaad een gifgasaanval heeft plaatsgevonden op de burgerbevolking van bepaalde wijken in Damascus, en dat alle bewijs over de schuldvraag in de richting van het Assad regime en regeringsgetrouwe troepen wijst.
Vandaag is ook een week nadat Human Rights Watch op basis van haar eigen onafhankelijke onderzoek precies dezelfde conclusies trok.

Vandaag plaats ik een aangrijpend stuk dat ik van 't weekend tegenkwam in de Washington Post, geschreven door de (Alevitische!) Syrische schrijfster Samar Yazbek; Een stuk dat durft te benoemen in welk een tweeslachtigheid mensen terecht kunnen komen als ze eerlijk over dit soort zaken nadenken, vanuit het besef dat in de oorlog waarin men terecht is gekomen " goed " en " kwaad " niet meer als dusdanig te onderscheiden zijn, maar dwars door elkaar heenlopen.

The novelist vs. the revolutionary: My own Syrian debate
Samar Yazbek

I am two women. They stand head to head, at loggerheads.

The revolutionary in me joined what started as peaceful demonstrations against the Syrian government in March 2011. The novelist in me fled to France that July.



The revolutionary, who has several times since then furtively crossed the border back into her country, is steeped in the smell of blood. She wipes the dust off the corpses of children disfigured by violence, stops to wring out her heart, then carries on.

The novelist struggles to close her eyes to the atrocities: She can’t take any more. She begs the revolutionary to stop walking through Syria’s circles of hell.

But the other voice rebukes her: “It is up to you to step into this hell, to bear witness to it, darling novelist. It is up to you to work against all that is dark and violent, everything that is leading your country to ruin.”

The novelist, living in exile, in the world of politicians and diplomats, far removed from falling shells and sudden death, wonders whether Syria should be hesitant about welcoming military strikes from the West. She argues that no country has the right to interfere in the affairs of another, that independence and national sovereignty are sacred. And she questions whether hitting military targets without taking down President Bashar al-Assad, especially while Russia and Iran continue to support him, will bring a shift from the inhumanity that the regime has imposed.

The revolutionary, moving among guerilla fighters and civilian activists, stands by those who are living under the regime’s bombardment and dying at the hands of its military machine. She argues that sovereignty shouldn’t mean the freedom to kill one’s own people, to displace them or to force a sectarian wedge between them. She notes that the soldiers she overheard speaking Farsi when the rural town of Haish was annihilated are evidence that international intervention happened long ago. She adds that Syria is not the Assad regime. Syria is the Syrian people.

The novelist looks on with bewilderment at the religious extremism of groups supposedly representing the opposition: preventing women from going out in public, carrying out arrests, threats and killings, all in the name of Islam.

The revolutionary, who has met with leaders of Jabhat al-Nusra, Ahrar al-Sham and other influential jihadist battalions, is gripped by fear at what they represent. But she believes that Assad has encouraged them, knowing that an unsavory alternative to his regime makes the international community hesitant to intervene. She has interviewed dozens of jihadists who told her they had been in Assad’s prisons until they were suddenly released at the beginning of the revolution. She believes that Assad’s violence gives them legitimacy and that only the elimination of the regime can rescue Syrians from the increasing threat of extremism.

This same woman has witnessed the presence of moderate fighters and heroic civilian activists who have not received the support they need. And she recalls long talks with Syrian families who reject the exclusion of women and with the mothers who keep walking their children to school, despite the continual shelling by Assad’s warplanes.

The novelist regrets that the opposition movement has evolved from its peaceful origin. She refuses to condone, let alone applaud, armed uprisings. “Isn’t political opposition the better alternative?” she meekly suggests.

The other woman laughs in her face and rejects her logic. “What are you waiting for, you futile scribbler, when more than 100,000 people lie dead and thousands are imprisoned or missing? When hospitals are being shelled and doctors targeted, when there are massacres in bakeries and people are deprived of water and electricity? What more do you ask of your people? What kind of justice is it that you’re after?”

These two women crash about beneath my skin, colliding at every twist and turn of this unfinished narrative. But there’s one thing they agree on: Anything that might bring a definitive end to the murderous Assad and his regime is a force for good. The question is: Does the world really want to stop these atrocities, or is it happy to stand by and watch?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-novelist-vs-the-revolutionary-my-own-syrian-debate/2013/09/13/188fad04-1b51-11e3-a628-7e6dde8f889d_story.html?hpid=z3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samar_Yazbek


Mijn stelling is meer een vraag: Hoe ver moet deze waanzin nog doorgaan, hoeveel kinderen moeten nog verminkt of vermoord worden, voordat een vredesproces een kans zal krijgen?

De VN is nu aan zet.
Het is de hoogste tijd dat de VN geloofwaardige stappen zet, stappen die een einde aan het bloedvergieten daadwerkelijk dichterbij brengt.

Dat er gifgas is gebruikt dat stond al onomstotelijk vast maar helaas is het nog steeds niet duidelijk wie de raketten heeft afgevuurd en ook daar moet bewijs geleverd worden.

Yutte Brøtbørda: Re: De VN aan zet..... (ma sep 16, 2013 4:07 pm)



Vandaag is de dag dat de VN Veiligheidsraad te horen krijgt dat er op 21 augustus inderdaad een gifgasaanval heeft plaatsgevonden op de burgerbevolking van bepaalde wijken in Damascus, en dat alle bewijs over de schuldvraag in de richting van het Assad regime en regeringsgetrouwe troepen wijst.
Vandaag is ook een week nadat Human Rights Watch op basis van haar eigen onafhankelijke onderzoek precies dezelfde conclusies trok.

Vandaag plaats ik een aangrijpend stuk dat ik van 't weekend tegenkwam in de Washington Post, geschreven door de (Alevitische!) Syrische schrijfster Samar Yazbek; Een stuk dat durft te benoemen in welk een tweeslachtigheid mensen terecht kunnen komen als ze eerlijk over dit soort zaken nadenken, vanuit het besef dat in de oorlog waarin men terecht is gekomen " goed " en " kwaad " niet meer als dusdanig te onderscheiden zijn, maar dwars door elkaar heenlopen.

The novelist vs. the revolutionary: My own Syrian debate
Samar Yazbek

I am two women. They stand head to head, at loggerheads.

The revolutionary in me joined what started as peaceful demonstrations against the Syrian government in March 2011. The novelist in me fled to France that July.



The revolutionary, who has several times since then furtively crossed the border back into her country, is steeped in the smell of blood. She wipes the dust off the corpses of children disfigured by violence, stops to wring out her heart, then carries on.

The novelist struggles to close her eyes to the atrocities: She can’t take any more. She begs the revolutionary to stop walking through Syria’s circles of hell.

But the other voice rebukes her: “It is up to you to step into this hell, to bear witness to it, darling novelist. It is up to you to work against all that is dark and violent, everything that is leading your country to ruin.”

The novelist, living in exile, in the world of politicians and diplomats, far removed from falling shells and sudden death, wonders whether Syria should be hesitant about welcoming military strikes from the West. She argues that no country has the right to interfere in the affairs of another, that independence and national sovereignty are sacred. And she questions whether hitting military targets without taking down President Bashar al-Assad, especially while Russia and Iran continue to support him, will bring a shift from the inhumanity that the regime has imposed.

The revolutionary, moving among guerilla fighters and civilian activists, stands by those who are living under the regime’s bombardment and dying at the hands of its military machine. She argues that sovereignty shouldn’t mean the freedom to kill one’s own people, to displace them or to force a sectarian wedge between them. She notes that the soldiers she overheard speaking Farsi when the rural town of Haish was annihilated are evidence that international intervention happened long ago. She adds that Syria is not the Assad regime. Syria is the Syrian people.

The novelist looks on with bewilderment at the religious extremism of groups supposedly representing the opposition: preventing women from going out in public, carrying out arrests, threats and killings, all in the name of Islam.

The revolutionary, who has met with leaders of Jabhat al-Nusra, Ahrar al-Sham and other influential jihadist battalions, is gripped by fear at what they represent. But she believes that Assad has encouraged them, knowing that an unsavory alternative to his regime makes the international community hesitant to intervene. She has interviewed dozens of jihadists who told her they had been in Assad’s prisons until they were suddenly released at the beginning of the revolution. She believes that Assad’s violence gives them legitimacy and that only the elimination of the regime can rescue Syrians from the increasing threat of extremism.

This same woman has witnessed the presence of moderate fighters and heroic civilian activists who have not received the support they need. And she recalls long talks with Syrian families who reject the exclusion of women and with the mothers who keep walking their children to school, despite the continual shelling by Assad’s warplanes.

The novelist regrets that the opposition movement has evolved from its peaceful origin. She refuses to condone, let alone applaud, armed uprisings. “Isn’t political opposition the better alternative?” she meekly suggests.

The other woman laughs in her face and rejects her logic. “What are you waiting for, you futile scribbler, when more than 100,000 people lie dead and thousands are imprisoned or missing? When hospitals are being shelled and doctors targeted, when there are massacres in bakeries and people are deprived of water and electricity? What more do you ask of your people? What kind of justice is it that you’re after?”

These two women crash about beneath my skin, colliding at every twist and turn of this unfinished narrative. But there’s one thing they agree on: Anything that might bring a definitive end to the murderous Assad and his regime is a force for good. The question is: Does the world really want to stop these atrocities, or is it happy to stand by and watch?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-novelist-vs-the-revolutionary-my-own-syrian-debate/2013/09/13/188fad04-1b51-11e3-a628-7e6dde8f889d_story.html?hpid=z3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samar_Yazbek


Mijn stelling is meer een vraag: Hoe ver moet deze waanzin nog doorgaan, hoeveel kinderen moeten nog verminkt of vermoord worden, voordat een vredesproces een kans zal krijgen?

De VN is nu aan zet.
Het is de hoogste tijd dat de VN geloofwaardige stappen zet, stappen die een einde aan het bloedvergieten daadwerkelijk dichterbij brengt.

Dat er gifgas is gebruikt dat stond al onomstotelijk vast maar helaas is het nog steeds niet duidelijk wie de raketten heeft afgevuurd en ook daar moet bewijs geleverd worden.
http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/syria_cw0913_web_1.pdf (.pdf)


:hoedaf:

panda: Re: De VN aan zet..... (ma sep 16, 2013 7:01 pm)




Vandaag is de dag dat de VN Veiligheidsraad te horen krijgt dat er op 21 augustus inderdaad een gifgasaanval heeft plaatsgevonden op de burgerbevolking van bepaalde wijken in Damascus, en dat alle bewijs over de schuldvraag in de richting van het Assad regime en regeringsgetrouwe troepen wijst.
Vandaag is ook een week nadat Human Rights Watch op basis van haar eigen onafhankelijke onderzoek precies dezelfde conclusies trok.

Vandaag plaats ik een aangrijpend stuk dat ik van 't weekend tegenkwam in de Washington Post, geschreven door de (Alevitische!) Syrische schrijfster Samar Yazbek; Een stuk dat durft te benoemen in welk een tweeslachtigheid mensen terecht kunnen komen als ze eerlijk over dit soort zaken nadenken, vanuit het besef dat in de oorlog waarin men terecht is gekomen " goed " en " kwaad " niet meer als dusdanig te onderscheiden zijn, maar dwars door elkaar heenlopen.

The novelist vs. the revolutionary: My own Syrian debate
Samar Yazbek

I am two women. They stand head to head, at loggerheads.

The revolutionary in me joined what started as peaceful demonstrations against the Syrian government in March 2011. The novelist in me fled to France that July.



The revolutionary, who has several times since then furtively crossed the border back into her country, is steeped in the smell of blood. She wipes the dust off the corpses of children disfigured by violence, stops to wring out her heart, then carries on.

The novelist struggles to close her eyes to the atrocities: She can’t take any more. She begs the revolutionary to stop walking through Syria’s circles of hell.

But the other voice rebukes her: “It is up to you to step into this hell, to bear witness to it, darling novelist. It is up to you to work against all that is dark and violent, everything that is leading your country to ruin.”

The novelist, living in exile, in the world of politicians and diplomats, far removed from falling shells and sudden death, wonders whether Syria should be hesitant about welcoming military strikes from the West. She argues that no country has the right to interfere in the affairs of another, that independence and national sovereignty are sacred. And she questions whether hitting military targets without taking down President Bashar al-Assad, especially while Russia and Iran continue to support him, will bring a shift from the inhumanity that the regime has imposed.

The revolutionary, moving among guerilla fighters and civilian activists, stands by those who are living under the regime’s bombardment and dying at the hands of its military machine. She argues that sovereignty shouldn’t mean the freedom to kill one’s own people, to displace them or to force a sectarian wedge between them. She notes that the soldiers she overheard speaking Farsi when the rural town of Haish was annihilated are evidence that international intervention happened long ago. She adds that Syria is not the Assad regime. Syria is the Syrian people.

The novelist looks on with bewilderment at the religious extremism of groups supposedly representing the opposition: preventing women from going out in public, carrying out arrests, threats and killings, all in the name of Islam.

The revolutionary, who has met with leaders of Jabhat al-Nusra, Ahrar al-Sham and other influential jihadist battalions, is gripped by fear at what they represent. But she believes that Assad has encouraged them, knowing that an unsavory alternative to his regime makes the international community hesitant to intervene. She has interviewed dozens of jihadists who told her they had been in Assad’s prisons until they were suddenly released at the beginning of the revolution. She believes that Assad’s violence gives them legitimacy and that only the elimination of the regime can rescue Syrians from the increasing threat of extremism.

This same woman has witnessed the presence of moderate fighters and heroic civilian activists who have not received the support they need. And she recalls long talks with Syrian families who reject the exclusion of women and with the mothers who keep walking their children to school, despite the continual shelling by Assad’s warplanes.

The novelist regrets that the opposition movement has evolved from its peaceful origin. She refuses to condone, let alone applaud, armed uprisings. “Isn’t political opposition the better alternative?” she meekly suggests.

The other woman laughs in her face and rejects her logic. “What are you waiting for, you futile scribbler, when more than 100,000 people lie dead and thousands are imprisoned or missing? When hospitals are being shelled and doctors targeted, when there are massacres in bakeries and people are deprived of water and electricity? What more do you ask of your people? What kind of justice is it that you’re after?”

These two women crash about beneath my skin, colliding at every twist and turn of this unfinished narrative. But there’s one thing they agree on: Anything that might bring a definitive end to the murderous Assad and his regime is a force for good. The question is: Does the world really want to stop these atrocities, or is it happy to stand by and watch?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-novelist-vs-the-revolutionary-my-own-syrian-debate/2013/09/13/188fad04-1b51-11e3-a628-7e6dde8f889d_story.html?hpid=z3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samar_Yazbek


Mijn stelling is meer een vraag: Hoe ver moet deze waanzin nog doorgaan, hoeveel kinderen moeten nog verminkt of vermoord worden, voordat een vredesproces een kans zal krijgen?

De VN is nu aan zet.
Het is de hoogste tijd dat de VN geloofwaardige stappen zet, stappen die een einde aan het bloedvergieten daadwerkelijk dichterbij brengt.

Dat er gifgas is gebruikt dat stond al onomstotelijk vast maar helaas is het nog steeds niet duidelijk wie de raketten heeft afgevuurd en ook daar moet bewijs geleverd worden.
http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/syria_cw0913_web_1.pdf (.pdf)


:hoedaf:

Het 'bewijs' van de HRW is natuurlijk uitermate zwak. Zo baseert ze haar conclusie dat het regime de dader is op dezelfde argumenten als die we al vanaf dag 1 van de VS horen:
a) Er is veel gifgas gebruikt en van het regime weten we dat zij veel gifgas hebben
b) Er zijn raketten gevonden in het getroffen gebied die geschikt zijn om Sarin te vervoeren en van het regime weten we dat ze dergelijke raketten hebben
c) Er vond een aanval door het regime plaats toen ook het gifgas werd verspreid.

Maar a, b en c voeren helemaal niet tot de conclusie dat het regime de dader is: het vertelt ons slechts dat we zeker weten dat het regime het gedaan zou kunnen hebben en dat we niet zeker weten of ook de rebellen het gedaan zouden kunnen hebben omdat we niet weten wat de rebellen - in tegenstelling tot het regime - eigenlijk allemaal aan wapens hebben. Maar bovenal is er geen enkel bewijs dat het gifgas is verspreid door de gevonden raketten: het is ook mogelijk dat de rebellen het gifgas anderszins hebben verspreid tijdens een aanval van het regime met die raketten. Ook het HRW lijkt dat te weten, maar schrijven dat weg omdat dat niet consistent zou zijn met de berichten van de rebellen: uiteindelijk berust het hele bewijs op "wat de rebellen ons vertelden", maar dat is natuurlijk volstrekt geen bewijs. Blijkbaar weet het HRW niet dat de waarheid het eerste slachtoffer is in een oorlog en dat je de rebellen net zo min op hun blauwe ogen moet geloven dan de blauwe ogen van Assad. Toch wemelt het hele stuk van bewijsvoering op de grond van "according to local activists...", "local activists say that...", etc. Hier lijkt zich dezelfde fout te herhalen als die eerder met Joegoslavie werd begaan: de Serviers maakten de cruciale tactische fout door niet met de westerse media en NGO's te spreken waardoor de media en NGO's volledig afhankelijk werden van de informatie van de opstandelingen die zo hun propaganda als de waarheid konden verkopen. Het stuk van HRW lijdt aan datzelfde euvel: het berust geheel op informatie van de rebellen en niets van het regime, zodat het dan ook geen toeval is dat de conclusie precies is wat de rebellen wilden dat de conclusie is.

Yutte Brøtbørda: Re: De VN aan zet..... (ma sep 16, 2013 7:31 pm)

Panda wilde zo graag onafhankelijke bronnen, en stelde dáár wél vertrouwen in te hebben....

Panda heeft tot nog toe nog niet één feitelijk gegeven weten in te brengen dat richting een andere dader dan het regime wijst.

Logisch dus dat Panda, nadat hem feitelijke bewijzen uit onafhankelijke bronnen worden voorgelegd, zich vooral wenst bezig te houden met allerlei verdachtmakingen richting die onafhankelijke bronnen.......

Verdachtmakingen die uitsluitend gebaseerd zijn op speculatie, en geen enkel feit aandragen dat werkelijk de integriteit van het HRW rapport in twijfel trekt.

Panda wil dus helemaal geen onafhankelijke informatie, hij wil alleen maar informatie die in zijn politieke straatje past.





Gelukkig zijn de onderzoekers van de VN wél bereid onbevooroordeeld naar de zaak te kijken, en zal de VN Veiligheidsraad vanavond dus ook te horen krijgen dat alle bewijs van schuld richting het Assad regime wijst.

Yutte Brøtbørda: Re: De VN aan zet..... (ma sep 16, 2013 11:13 pm)




Vandaag is de dag dat de VN Veiligheidsraad te horen krijgt dat er op 21 augustus inderdaad een gifgasaanval heeft plaatsgevonden op de burgerbevolking van bepaalde wijken in Damascus, en dat alle bewijs over de schuldvraag in de richting van het Assad regime en regeringsgetrouwe troepen wijst.
Vandaag is ook een week nadat Human Rights Watch op basis van haar eigen onafhankelijke onderzoek precies dezelfde conclusies trok.

Vandaag plaats ik een aangrijpend stuk dat ik van 't weekend tegenkwam in de Washington Post, geschreven door de (Alevitische!) Syrische schrijfster Samar Yazbek; Een stuk dat durft te benoemen in welk een tweeslachtigheid mensen terecht kunnen komen als ze eerlijk over dit soort zaken nadenken, vanuit het besef dat in de oorlog waarin men terecht is gekomen " goed " en " kwaad " niet meer als dusdanig te onderscheiden zijn, maar dwars door elkaar heenlopen.

The novelist vs. the revolutionary: My own Syrian debate
Samar Yazbek

I am two women. They stand head to head, at loggerheads.

The revolutionary in me joined what started as peaceful demonstrations against the Syrian government in March 2011. The novelist in me fled to France that July.



The revolutionary, who has several times since then furtively crossed the border back into her country, is steeped in the smell of blood. She wipes the dust off the corpses of children disfigured by violence, stops to wring out her heart, then carries on.

The novelist struggles to close her eyes to the atrocities: She can’t take any more. She begs the revolutionary to stop walking through Syria’s circles of hell.

But the other voice rebukes her: “It is up to you to step into this hell, to bear witness to it, darling novelist. It is up to you to work against all that is dark and violent, everything that is leading your country to ruin.”

The novelist, living in exile, in the world of politicians and diplomats, far removed from falling shells and sudden death, wonders whether Syria should be hesitant about welcoming military strikes from the West. She argues that no country has the right to interfere in the affairs of another, that independence and national sovereignty are sacred. And she questions whether hitting military targets without taking down President Bashar al-Assad, especially while Russia and Iran continue to support him, will bring a shift from the inhumanity that the regime has imposed.

The revolutionary, moving among guerilla fighters and civilian activists, stands by those who are living under the regime’s bombardment and dying at the hands of its military machine. She argues that sovereignty shouldn’t mean the freedom to kill one’s own people, to displace them or to force a sectarian wedge between them. She notes that the soldiers she overheard speaking Farsi when the rural town of Haish was annihilated are evidence that international intervention happened long ago. She adds that Syria is not the Assad regime. Syria is the Syrian people.

The novelist looks on with bewilderment at the religious extremism of groups supposedly representing the opposition: preventing women from going out in public, carrying out arrests, threats and killings, all in the name of Islam.

The revolutionary, who has met with leaders of Jabhat al-Nusra, Ahrar al-Sham and other influential jihadist battalions, is gripped by fear at what they represent. But she believes that Assad has encouraged them, knowing that an unsavory alternative to his regime makes the international community hesitant to intervene. She has interviewed dozens of jihadists who told her they had been in Assad’s prisons until they were suddenly released at the beginning of the revolution. She believes that Assad’s violence gives them legitimacy and that only the elimination of the regime can rescue Syrians from the increasing threat of extremism.

This same woman has witnessed the presence of moderate fighters and heroic civilian activists who have not received the support they need. And she recalls long talks with Syrian families who reject the exclusion of women and with the mothers who keep walking their children to school, despite the continual shelling by Assad’s warplanes.

The novelist regrets that the opposition movement has evolved from its peaceful origin. She refuses to condone, let alone applaud, armed uprisings. “Isn’t political opposition the better alternative?” she meekly suggests.

The other woman laughs in her face and rejects her logic. “What are you waiting for, you futile scribbler, when more than 100,000 people lie dead and thousands are imprisoned or missing? When hospitals are being shelled and doctors targeted, when there are massacres in bakeries and people are deprived of water and electricity? What more do you ask of your people? What kind of justice is it that you’re after?”

These two women crash about beneath my skin, colliding at every twist and turn of this unfinished narrative. But there’s one thing they agree on: Anything that might bring a definitive end to the murderous Assad and his regime is a force for good. The question is: Does the world really want to stop these atrocities, or is it happy to stand by and watch?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-novelist-vs-the-revolutionary-my-own-syrian-debate/2013/09/13/188fad04-1b51-11e3-a628-7e6dde8f889d_story.html?hpid=z3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samar_Yazbek


Mijn stelling is meer een vraag: Hoe ver moet deze waanzin nog doorgaan, hoeveel kinderen moeten nog verminkt of vermoord worden, voordat een vredesproces een kans zal krijgen?

De VN is nu aan zet.
Het is de hoogste tijd dat de VN geloofwaardige stappen zet, stappen die een einde aan het bloedvergieten daadwerkelijk dichterbij brengt.

Dat er gifgas is gebruikt dat stond al onomstotelijk vast maar helaas is het nog steeds niet duidelijk wie de raketten heeft afgevuurd en ook daar moet bewijs geleverd worden.
http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/syria_cw0913_web_1.pdf (.pdf)


:hoedaf:

Het VN rapport (.pdf) verdient hier natuurlijk ook geplaatst te worden.

:hoedaf:

Gestopt: Re: De VN aan zet..... (di sep 17, 2013 8:09 am)


Gelukkig zijn de onderzoekers van de VN wél bereid onbevooroordeeld naar de zaak te kijken, en zal de VN Veiligheidsraad vanavond dus ook te horen krijgen dat alle bewijs van schuld richting het Assad regime wijst.

Ik heb het VN rapport zelf niet gelezen maar in mijn krant staat dat het niet bewezen is dat Assad er achter zit en dat Carla del Ponte, die al in mei beweerde dat de rebellen Sarin hadden, nu verder onderzoek gaat doen naar 14 aanvallen van de rebellen.

da Vinci: Re: De VN aan zet..... (di sep 17, 2013 2:22 pm)



Gelukkig zijn de onderzoekers van de VN wél bereid onbevooroordeeld naar de zaak te kijken, en zal de VN Veiligheidsraad vanavond dus ook te horen krijgen dat alle bewijs van schuld richting het Assad regime wijst.

Ik heb het VN rapport zelf niet gelezen maar in mijn krant staat dat het niet bewezen is dat Assad er achter zit en dat Carla del Ponte, die al in mei beweerde dat de rebellen Sarin hadden, nu verder onderzoek gaat doen naar 14 aanvallen van de rebellen.
Idd. het staat vast dat er gifgas gebruikt is gebruikt maar door wie is nog steeds niet duidelijk.

Yutte Brøtbørda: Re: De VN aan zet..... (di sep 17, 2013 2:43 pm)



Gelukkig zijn de onderzoekers van de VN wél bereid onbevooroordeeld naar de zaak te kijken, en zal de VN Veiligheidsraad vanavond dus ook te horen krijgen dat alle bewijs van schuld richting het Assad regime wijst.

Ik heb het VN rapport zelf niet gelezen maar in mijn krant staat dat het niet bewezen is dat Assad er achter zit en dat Carla del Ponte, die al in mei beweerde dat de rebellen Sarin hadden, nu verder onderzoek gaat doen naar 14 aanvallen van de rebellen.
Tja, nog los van je gebrek aan bronvermelding, is het natuurlijk een beetje lui van je om de gegeven rapporten niet te lezen, en wél te menen er twijfel over te moeten zaaien.

Dat Carla del Ponte volgens jouw niet nader genoemde krant enkel onderzoek zou gaan doen naar aanvallen van " de rebellen " is in ieder geval hoogst onwaarschijnlijk, gezien de uitspraken van haar " chairperson " dhr Paulo Pinheiro dat hoewel alle partijen oorlogsmisdaden plegen, alleen het regime misdaden tegen de menselijkheid heeft gepleegd.
Een conclusie die hun VN commissie ook in hun laatste rapport nadrukkelijk trekt. In datzelfde rapport staat overigens een lijst met misdaden gepleegd in de periode vanaf half mei tot half augustus, een lijst die vele malen groter is waar het regeringstroepen betreft, dan waar het oppositiegroepen betreft. Maar dat terzijde.

Want het gaat hier dus om het bewijs dat de regering verantwoordelijk is voor de gifgasaanval van 21 augustus jl., en blijkbaar heeft men er behoefte aan dat die bewijsvoering hier uitgespeld wordt.

:write:

Daartoe lijkt het me goed om te beginnen met iets belangrijks uit te leggen over zenuwgassen, en meerspeciaal het gebruikte zenuwgas sarin.
Sarin is van zichzelf een behoorlijk stroperige vloeistof, die om als wapen ingezet te worden gemengd moet worden met een dragervloeistof die er voor zorgt dat de sarin in miniscule druppels door de lucht verspreid wordt (aerosol), en zich als een gas zal gedragen.
Dit mengen moet gebeuren kort voor de aanval, omdat in gemengde toestand de sarin vervalt en dus niet lang bewaarbaar is. Dit mengen moet ook door kundig personeel gebeuren, en vereist stevige veiligheidsmaatregelen, w.o. het dragen van beschermende kleding en gasmaskers, en de aanwezigheid van (mechanische) luchtverversing.

Voor de aanval van 21 augustus jl. weten we dat er honderden liters mengsel moeten zijn aangemaakt (> 700 l.!).
De benodigdheden voor het aanmaken van een dergelijke hoeveelheid van een zo gevaarlijk mengsel zijn niet makkelijk geheim te houden.
Diverse onafhankelijke monitor-organisaties (w.o. HRW) hebben gerapporteerd geen enkele aanwijzing te hebben dat er oppositiegroeperingen zouden zijn die over zulke faciliteiten beschikken, evenmin overigens over de capaciteiten om dergelijke hoeveelheden zenuwgas überhaupt op te slaan.

Van de Syrische regering is gevoegelijk bekend dat ze niet alleen over de benodigde voorraden sarin beschikt, maar óók over de benodigde faciliteiten om dergelijk grote hoeveelheden er van aan te mengen, alsmede over personeel dat geschoold is om dat te doen en om de wapensystemen te vullen met het vers gemaakte mengsel.

Uit de hoorzittingen voor het Amerikaanse congres kunnen we weten dat beschermende maatregelen voor overig militair personeel van het regime in en rond Damascus werden genomen in de uren vóór de aanvallen.

:evendenken:

Over de gebruikte wapensystemen rapporteren zowel de VN als HRW (in de rapporten die ik hierboven al heb geplaatst) dat er twee vormen van munitie zijn aangetroffen, het gaat om Russisch gemaakte 140mm artilleriegranaten en om 330mm raketten van onbekende (wrsch. Syrische) industriële productie.
Beiden zijn munities die vanaf voertuig-gebaseerde lanceerplatformen moeten worden afgeschoten.

HRW, dat de gebruikte munitie en wapensystemen in dit conflict nauwkeurig monitort, rapporteert geen enkele indicatie te hebben dat oppositiegroepen over één van deze twee wapensystemen zouden beschikken.

Van allebei de wapensystemen is bekend dat regeringstroepen over de benodigde lanceerplatformen en bijbehorende munitie beschikt.

Van de 140mm granaten is in dit conflict nog niet eerder gerapporteerd dat ze gebruikt zijn, van de 330mm raketten is bekend dat alle gerapporteerd gebruik er van gericht was tegen oppositiegroeperingen c.q. tegen oppositie gehouden terrein.

:zwemmen:

De VN heeft gerapporteerd over de richting vanwaaruit de munitie is aangekomen , HRW heeft in haar rapportage uitgebreide informatie over het bereik van de gebruikte munitie opgenomen.
Wie de moeite neemt om deze informatie even te combineren met de gerapporteerde inslaglocaties, zal de kunnen constateren dat de munitie moet zijn afgeschoten uit gebied dat in handen van regeringstroepen is.

Sterker, de door de VN gegeven herkomstrichtingen komen, precies binnen het bereik van de gebruikte munitie, bijeen op de grote basis van de Republikeinse Garde op een berg ten noordwesten van het centrum van Damascus. :evendenken:

Voor de munitie die in Mouademiyyah (zuidelijk Ghouta) is terecht gekomen (de 140mm granaten), geldt dat de gerapporteerde baan een drietal regeringsbases kruist, en geen enkele door oppositie behouden grond.
Voor de munitie die in Zamalka (oostelijk Ghouta) is terecht gekomen, geldt dat de gerapporteerde baan regelrecht in de richting van de genoemde Republikeinse Garde basis wijst, en voor zo ver de baan oppositiegrond kruist dat een locatie is die continu zwaar bevochten is en wordt (en waar dus zelfs de enkele aanwezigheid van geladen chemische munitie een groot gevaar voor de aanwezige strijders en hun stellingen betreft!).

:zwemmen:

Daar komt bij dat binnen de gegeven tien kilometer die het maximale bereik van de beide gebruikte munitievormen is, de aanwezige oppositietroepen voor een zeer groot deel bestaan uit lokale strijders, mensen wiens familie binnen het opstandige gebied rondom Damascus wonen.
Het vereist een grote mate aan fantasie om deze mensen motieven toe te dichten die hen er toe zouden aanzetten om hun eigen familieleden op zo'n afschuwelijke wijze af te slachten.

Over het motief voor regeringstroepen om chemische wapens in te zetten heb ik al eerder, in een ander draadje, uitgebreid geschreven en bronnen gegeven die er gedetailleerd op in zijn gegaan. Maar de bottom line is dat hoewel regeringsgetrouwe troepen (w.o. Hezbollah) deze zomer terrein hebben weten terug te winnen in het Westen en Noordwesten van het land, tegelijkertijd de situatie in en rond Damascus langzaam maar zeker een wanhopige positie aan het worden was voor Assad en de zijnen.

:zwemmen:

Goed. We hebben dus, zoals de Amerikanen altijd zo mooi zeggen, "means, motive and opportunity" voor de regeringstroepen om deze aanval uit te voeren.
Bovendien hebben we forensisch bewijs dat direct in de richting van regeringstroepen wijst, en geen enkele aanwijzing die een alternatieve herkomst van de gebruikte chemische wapens ondersteunt.

Maar, gezien de mate van detail waarin het bewijs is uitgespeld in de gegeven rapporten, kan ik mij goed voorstellen dat mensen het overzicht kwijt raken.
Ik zal dus een fictief voorbeeld geven dat volgens mij wel duidelijk kan maken hoe stevig de staat van het (publiekelijk bekende) bewijs eigenlijk is:

In de straat waar Donald Duck woont zijn een aantal incidenten met een sluipschutter geweest, onder de slachtoffers zijn Kwik Duck, Kwek Duck en Katrien Duck.
Uit forensisch onderzoek is gebleken dat het gebruikte wapen een Carcano M91 ( :wink: ) is geweest, alsook dat alle gebruikte schootslijnen samen komen op het terrein van Buurman Bolderbast.
In de betreffende wijk is uitsluitend van Buurman Bolderbast bekend dat hij beschikt over een Carcano M91, en dat hij jarenlang lid is geweest van de Duckstadse schietclub alwaar hij zich geoefend heeft in het gebruik er van.
Ook is bekend dat Buurman Bolderbast thuis was tijdens alle incidenten.

Van geen van de andere wijkbewoners bestaat ook maar de geringste aanwijzing dat zij over een karabijn of ander vuurwapen beschikken, noch dat zij geoefend zouden zijn in het gebruik er van.
Ook is geen van de andere wijkbewoners op bezoek geweest bij Buurman Bolderbast, noch is er enige aanwijzing dat er iemand anders dan Bolderbast zelf op zijn terrein aanwezig was tijdens de incidenten.

Goh, wie zou nou toch de Duckstadse sluipschutter zijn...???

:evendenken:


 [1]   [2]   [3]